Background
Mike Hinchey Lero

Lero – the Irish Software Research Centre (Lero) has been selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) for the implementation of a research programme worth €400,000. The 18 month programme, which will be led by Lero Director Prof. Mike Hinchey, will commence this month.

Lero will collaborate with chip manufacturer Cobham Gaisler AB of Gothenburg, Sweden on the software behind specialist microchips to be used in European space missions. The Cobham Gaisler  LEON radiation hardened microchip, which was developed in association with the European Space Agency, is designed to operate in harsh environments such as space.

Lero researchers based at the University of Limerick will work on a new back end for the Open Source LLVM compiler library to enable it to be used for the LEON chip family. This is designed to expand the toolset available to developers working on the flight software for future European space missions in order to boost reliability.

This is the third and largest contract awarded in recent years by the European Space Agency to Lero, which is backed by Science Foundation Ireland.

“We are honoured to be selected for this important work,” commented Prof Mike Hinchey, Director, Lero. “Software designed for space missions needs to be leading edge and highly reliable in view of the cost, distance and unforgiving environment involved.”

Before heading up Lero, Prof. Hinchey was Director of the Software Engineering Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre in Greenbelt, Maryland. He remains a consultant to NASA.

Lero (www.lero.ie) is a global leader in software engineering research. It combines the best in Irish software talent by bringing together researchers from Dublin City University, Dundalk Institute of Technology, NUI Galway, Trinity College Dublin, University College Cork, University College Dublin and University of Limerick. It is funded by Science Foundation Ireland as well as by contracts from Irish and international technology corporations.

stripe

Limerick natives Patrick and John Collison’s Silicon Valley start-up Stripe has the potential to transform the plumbing of e-commerce globally and after signing up thousands of businesses large and small around the world they’ve launched the platform in Ireland today.

Ireland is the fourth country – and first Eurozone country – in which Stripe has launched at this stage and intends to shake up the established order of payment solutions currently “dominated by lumbering incumbent banks.”

The company’s technology provides functionality to make it easier for website owners to enable transactions, getting rid of the long drawn-out shopping cart approach and making payments as seamless and easy as buying apps or content on an iPhone.

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Professor Bashar Nuseibeh

An Irish-based researcher has been awarded a €2.5 million grant by the European Research Council.

Professor Bashar Nuseibeh of the Irish Software Engineering Research Centre – Lero – won the ERC advanced grant, which will run over five years, to focus on privacy and security threats relating to new mobile and cloud technology.

The programme will look at adaptive security and privacy, and will be a collaboration between Lero at the University of Limerick and the Open University in the UK. Prof Nuseibeh, who has been working with Lero since 2009, will lead the research teams.

It will research techniques for developing software systems to protect users from the shifting privacy and security threats as a result of new technology such as smartphones and tablets.

For more information click here